Break Out of the “Can I Have” Cycle: Arrange a Subscription Box That Your Children Can Look Forward to Instead of Asking Every Trip to the Store

We’ve all dreaded taking the kids shopping with us for the ‘can I have’ requests that usually ensue! It doesn’t have to be this way though, especially with the wealth of fun and also educational subscription boxes available for children. Put simply, these are themed boxes that are dispatched on a monthly basis to kids of all ages and on a huge variety of topics. There are educational subscription boxes or craft-based ones so you can choose the most appropriate for each child. Perhaps the biggest benefit is that you don’t get harassed when you go to the stores as your children are constantly looking forward to their next box!

What’s so good about Subscription Boxes

Possibly the best thing about subscription boxes is that there is such a wide variety, different capabilities and educational levels can be catered for. Children on the autism spectrum for example, can benefit significantly from boxes with toys that are specifically designed to build and develop sensory skills. Others may be more targeted towards creative children, allowing them to explore various crafts through participation in them. Most subscription boxes are affordable too and are sent out to children each month complete with full instructions for included activities and containing other theme-related information to interest them.

How to Choose the Best Subscription Box

Subscription boxes for children are hugely popular because they cater for everybody, also allowing children to focus on something they are particularly interested in. Children flourish when they are learning and having fun at the same time and this is very much the purpose of subscription boxes. If you have a child who has shown an interest in science, you can get a box that specialized in science. These are great for budding professors as they often include experiment kits.

You can also use subscription boxes to encourage your children in any subjects they may be having difficulty with at school. If they have an issue with reading and writing for example, you can subscribe to a box that deals with literacy that is also age-appropriate. Math boxes can make the subject fun where school may have been failing and have shown to be significant in boosting student performance. Language subscription boxes cover most modern languages and can be very beneficial for children, particularly if they have older relatives from other countries.

Happy Children means Happy Parents!

Children are rather expensive these days, especially when it comes to their entertainment with the wealth of technology now at their disposal. Subscription boxes take things back to basic by reverting to more traditional ways of learning, with fun-based activities and hands-on participation. They are also great for motivating children, as they eagerly anticipate the arrival of next month’s box. Perhaps the most compelling reason for getting subscription boxes for your kids is that they will no longer badger you to buy them things whenever you go to the store.

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Take A Step Back from Stress: A Family Getaway Is Exactly What You Need

Ah, Canada. Home of snow, hockey, and really nice people. At least that’s what the stereotypes about the Great White North would have you believe, and none of them address the country’s wonders. The image of Canada as a bigger version of Alaska needs to be corrected, specifically in regards to the greatness of Newfoundland and Labrador, the easternmost provinces of Canada.

What’s so relaxing about this place? One trip to the area’s website will show the user images of the beauty and grandeur of the Newfoundland and Labrador. But if pretty pictures aren’t enough, consider the following:

The Wildlife

Nothing says relaxation and escape like the wonders of nature, and Newfoundland and Labrador boasts an incredible variety of it. Aside from the cliffs and hills, the area also boasts multiple species of whales, including the signature humpback population. And if seeing whales sounds fantastic, a visitor can also take in the sights of Iceberg Alley and explore the coast.

But don’t think the province begins and ends on the coast. The province measures more than 400,000 kilometers, offering a visitor a big chance to get off the beaten path and take in the area’s natural beauties, including St. John’s, Terra Nova National Park, and the Torngat Mountains. And because it stands at the easternmost edge of Canada, the province carries a sense of escapism just in getting to it.

It’s Got Culture

Ever wanted to go to a music festival in an area once populated by Vikings? Newfoundland and Labrador has got you covered. Every city in the world boasts about its musical offerings, but the province goes further with its sheer variety of musical offerings.

And if music alone isn’t enough to tempt a visitor, the province’s history is on constant display. Visitors can follow the Viking Trail to L’Anse Aux Meadows, featuring the archaeological remains of a Norse encampment dating back over 1,000 years. If thinking about Viking warriors makes you thirsty, the province boasts a variety of craft beers and breweries. Everything about the culture here whispers to the visitors, inviting them to partake of the area’s offerings and take a deep breath while doing so.

Downtown St. John’s features some truly unique events, such as a Mardi Gras celebration in October, the province’s cultural facility, and the Mile One Centre, conveniently located near the Marriott St. John’s Newfoundland. And that doesn’t even include the nightlife, shopping, and sights of the area.

You’ll Need to Make a Few Trips

Getting off the beaten path sometimes means having to deal with crowds, and the journey to a place to relax can require some advance planning. As stated above, the province is huge. So huge, in fact, visitors may need to consider multiple trips just to take in all that Newfoundland and Labrador have to offer. And while the province’s location may seem like a deterrent, the area’s popularity requires some thought as to the best way to get there and get lost in the area’s wonders.

Plan ahead by considering rental vehicle information with accommodations. Take care of those requirements early so you can spend more time getting lost and breathing deep.

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What If Your Child Refuses Braces?

In the past, pop culture used glasses and braces as shorthand for ‘nerds’. The idea was that kids like that were bookish and uncool, even though in reality, they simply had flawed teeth or diminished eyesight (and parents with the resources to fix both). Unfortunately, people often believe what they see on TV more than what they see in the world outside. Sad but true.


These stereotypes were reinforced by the fact that few of the ‘cool’ adults wear braces or glasses in social settings. When they go out, they switch to contacts or sunglasses. As for braces, most people got rid of their ‘railway lines’ in their late teens.

These days, technology has made things easier in some ways. For example, more adults are embracing their braces. They are in a better position to pay for dental care and being older and wiser; they can recognise that the results outweigh the hassle. In certain demographics, adult braces have almost become a status symbol.

It’s not certain whether adult braces are a fad or a shift in attitudes towards oral health, but seeing adults in braces is certainly likely to reduce your child’s objections to braces. The more they see it, the more normal it will seem, and the less likely they are to refuse.

But why do patients need braces in the first place? Well, wearing braces for a few years can correct dental flaws like crowded or crooked teeth, overbites, or underbites. They can also repair a misaligned jaw or help injured jaw bones to heal.

Braces are most effective in teens and young adults since their jaws and permanent teeth are still growing, so they can be moulded more easily. If your child refuses braces, find out why they’re so against it. Try to get specific reasons, so that you can tackle them more effectively.

Most kids don’t want braces because they think their friends will make fun of them, or that they will look nerdy and uncool. Your first reflex as a parent is to either force them or reason with them. Both approaches can be difficult since force only makes them more stubborn, and teenagers aren’t always known for sound logic.

Rather than convincing your teens that braces are a good idea, lay out some objective benefits so that with time, the kids will see the light for themselves. Since teens are always on their screens and smartphones, use it against them. A quick online search will give you graphic before-and-after photos of celebrities that once wore braces.

Share these with your child for a triple benefit. It viscerally proves what an amazing aesthetic (and medicinal) change braces can make. It shows them some very cool people that had braces in the past. And it gives them a weapon to use against teasing. They can confidently say, ‘Guess who else wore braces! They’re pretty cool, so I guess I am too.’

Kids might still worry about their braces looking weird or being painful. Braces rarely hurt, and if they do, it’s short-lived. And modern braces can be colour-coded to match your teen’s style. Of course, you could compromise and get them invisible braces. They fix teeth in a far shorter time than conventional braces, and they’re not visible when they’re worn.


Invisalign can take as little as half the duration of traditional braces, and since you get a new fitted set every two weeks, there’s no tooth fatigue. Since teens view time quite differently from adults, it’ll be easier for them to think about their braces in two-week increments, as opposed to the standard two-year braces which seem like ‘for.e.verrrr!’

Invisalign offers lots of advantages to socially insecure teens. They are customised and fitted to each patient, matching the shape of their mouth, teeth, jaws, and tongue. This means they sit flush in the mouth and will not affect the way you talk. No orthodontic lisping here.

They’re also easier to maintain, since your teens can remove them when they need to eat, brush, or floss, so it’s a lot less work. Plus, if your teens were worried about the awkward care routine of cleaning their teeth at school or avoiding ‘fun’ (junk) foods while out with friends, they will love discreet aligners that can be slipped on and off with no discernible difference.

The only downside of Invisalign is that they don’t work on milk teeth, so if your child hasn’t erupted all their teeth yet, make a deal. Offer them a ‘stay of execution’ on the condition that once all their teeth are in, they will agree to invisible braces. This way, everyone is happy.

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Signs Your Kids Are Developing Bad Dental Habits

Most parents don’t worry too much about their kids’ teeth, especially below the age of six. It’s easy to take their dental teeth for granted. After all, your little ones are afraid of dentists, and chances are that you – as a parent – are equally wary. First off, you’re probably afraid because you’re seeing the wrong dentist, or because of bad memories in oral hygiene.


Fortunately, modern dentistry is nothing like the horror stories you heard or experienced in your childhood. With improved technology and dental practices, many treatments are quick and painless. Think about it. Braces can now be invisible, and there are advancements like sleep dentistry and laser dentistry that lower discomfort levels to nearly zero.

Another reason you might neglect the dental health of your children is that you assume milk teeth aren’t that important. You figure they’ll all fall out, so they don’t need much care. It doesn’t seem worth the effort of wrangling your kids into avoiding sweets or regularly brushing and flossing. It feels like a lot of unnecessary work.

While it’s true that baby teeth are temporary, they do affect your child’s permanent ones. If the baby teeth rot prematurely, they can affect the foundation and position of their adult dental formula, and that kind of deep-rooted damage is harder to correct.

Many good habits are developed in childhood, and good oral hygiene is no different. In the same way, bad dental habits acquired as a kid are likely to stay with your little ones for life. This becomes a deeper problem once you realise that a lot of these oral and dental patterns seem benign, so you probably haven’t done anything to stop them.

A lot of parents soothe their babies and toddlers to sleep using bottle or breastfeeding. While this is fun for the baby, it can harm their teeth. How? Well, if a baby falls asleep at the breast, there’s a big chance they still have milk in their mouth. While the baby’s swallow reflex ensures this isn’t a choking hazard, it might still affect their gums and un-erupted teeth.

The same challenge faces babies who constantly have their bottles or pacifiers in their mouths. The problem is compounded when parents douse the pacifiers or fill the bottles with juice, sugary drinks, or sweetened substances. Some parents add a little cereal to the bottles to get the baby fuller and help them sleep through the night.

The danger in these tactics is that the babies’ teeth and gums are consistently bathed in sugar, which can lead to tooth decay. Even a little sugar can cause progressive damage, which is why the natural sugar in breast milk can be a problem as well. And some children continue to breastfeed all the way to their fifth or sixth birthdays.

For breastfed babies, you don’t have to deprive your child of your most intrinsic form of comfort. It’s good for their health, and bonds you to each other. But while there is some validated bliss in having your child fall asleep at your breast, keep an eye on them.

Once you’re sure they’re asleep, take your breast out of their mouth. Use the right unlatching technique, to avoid hurting your nipples and causing yourself unnecessary pain and cracking.

If you have a hectic day, it’s tempting to give your child a bottle to calm them as you cook, do housework, or run errands. Try other soothing methods instead, like a pacifier. Make sure the pacifier is clean, and don’t dip it in juice or honey.

You can also soothe your baby using a bottle filled with plain water instead of sweetened drinks and milk. Sometimes the sucking action calms the baby just as effectively as the choice of fluid, so unless the baby is hungry, water is a better choice. At bed time, a pacifier or a bottle with just a little water is healthier than cereal, juice, or milk.

If your baby is too little for a toothbrush, wipe their gums with a clean, damp cloth. Start this as early as possible, even from day one. It develops good oral hygiene habits. As your baby gets older, switch the bottle for a sippy cup, since it slips over the teeth and reduces the teeth’s exposure to sugar-based bacteria. The cup should hold water more often than juice.

Another matter you may not have considered is sucking their thumbs, tongues, or lips. This can cause overbite and possible lisping. This is fine for smaller kids but can affect their teeth if they haven’t stopped by age five or six. It can also get them bullied or teased, which has deep social and psychological effects that can last a long time.

Many parents confront the habit by scolding, teasing, or peppering the child’s thumb. These methods can be counterproductive because sucking is a soothing mechanism. It gives the child comfort, so stressing the child out might just make them seek more comfort. It can add shame and anxiety to their relief, which only reinforces the habit as they try to hide it.

Instead of punishing the child, use positive reinforcement to make the child want to stop on their own. Discover the triggers for sucking and find other ways of soothing your child’s unease. Once the child has agreed that they no longer want to suck, you can use a band aid or dental appliance to make the actually sucking less pleasant and therefore less appealing.

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10 Questions to Ask in Your Facelift Consultation

Considering a facelift? It’s time to book in for a consultation. In your consultation you should think of it like you’re interviewing the doctor for a job – well, you are really!

If you walk into the consultation with a list of questions to ask, you can make sure you have all bases covered. Here are ten of the most popular questions that clients have when coming to us for a facelift consultation.

1. What type of facelift do you recommend?
Full facelift with brow lift? Mini facelift? Ask the surgeon what he recommends is best for you.

2. How many years’ experience have you had in performing facelifts?
The more experience a surgeon has had, the more reliable their results.

3. Which hospital do you use?
Take an interest in which hospital or clinic you’ll be staying at for your surgery.

4. Will I need to stay overnight?
Find out whether the type of facelift you’re recommended will require an overnight stay or whether you’ll just be a day patient.

5. How long will I need to take off work for recovery?
Some types of facelifts require more time off work than others. Check when’s best for you to be heading back.

6. When will I be able to exercise again?
Because a facelift is facial surgery, you may have to wait longer to exercise than other types of surgery.

7. When will I need to come in for my next check up?
The doctor will need to see you for a follow-up appointment shortly after your surgery to check that your recovery is progressing as it should be.

8. Would you recommend other non-invasive treatments first?
In some cases, the surgeon may recommend that you try other non-invasive treatments for awhile such as fillers, muscle relaxants or peels if they think you don’t warrant a facelift as yet.

9. Will I need further surgery in the future?
Your face will still age after a facelift. You may need another facelift performed later on down the track for maintenance.

10. Could you provide a rough estimate of the cost involved?
Cost is an important factor in many people’s decision making processes. Your surgeon should be able to provide an estimate of costs.

Now you have your questions ready it’s time to book that consult!

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